Historic Roads Subject of April AHS Meeting


The featured speaker for the April 23 was Dr. W. Calvin Dickinson. Author of "The Walton Road: A Nineteenth Century Wilderness Highway in Tennessee" and 19 more books.
“We are fortunate to have Dr. Dickinson join us for our meeting,” said Danny Nichols, president of the Auburntown Historical Society. “We invite AHS members and visitors to attend what promises to be an interesting lecture about the period of time when early settlers were expanding across Tennessee via passages like the Walton Road, the Avery Trace, the Natchez Trace and other pioneer roads.”
The Walton Road and the Avery Trail were the main highways between Knoxville and Nashville in the 19th century.
“This book is a collection of travelogues along these pioneer trails in the 1800s,” Dickinson explained. “These travelers had to contend with nasty weather, wild animals, friendly Indians and devious innkeepers.”
Appointed by the Governor to the Tennessee Historical Commission, Dickinson is professor emeritus at Tennessee Technological University, where he taught history for 30 years until his retirement in 2000.
Born in Shreveport, La., and raised in East Texas, he attended Baylor University from which he received Bachelor's and Master's degrees. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina and has also studied at the College of William and Mary and East Carolina University. Dickinson was Instructor and Department Chair at Chowan College from 1961 to 1971 and was Associate Professor and Professor at Tennessee Technological University beginning in 1971.
During his career he has received numerous awards and honors. A prolific writer, he has authored dozens of papers and articles on various historical topics for a large number of historical journals and publications. He is a popular lecturer on historic topics.


Update: Dr. Dickinson's program was well-received, and those present bought many of his books. To obtain a copy of any of Dickinson's books, email him at cdickinson@tntech.edu.For more information on his published work and a partial list of his books, visit www.tennesseeuppercumberlandhistorybooks.blogspot.com.

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